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Serangan Udara Rejim Syria Ragut 20 Nyawa

BEIRUT: Sekurang-kurangnya 20 penduduk awam terbunuh semalam dalam serangan udara tentera Syria ke atas wilayah dikuasai pembangkang di utara negara itu, kata pemerhati perang.

Siri pengeboman dilancarkan di beberapa kawasan di utara Aleppo dan Idlib, lokasi tentera yang disokong Russia bertempur dengan pemberontak dan militan.

“Serangan rejim mengena dua kampung di selatan Aleppo, menyebabkan 15 penduduk awam terbunuh,” kata ketua Pemerhati Hak Asasi Manusia Syria (SOHR), Rami Abdel Rahman.

Di wilayah Idlib, serangan udara tentera kerajaan mengorbankan lima penduduk awam di bandar Saraqeb, kata SOHR.

Wilayah berkenaan ditawan kumpulan Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), yang dikuasai sekutu al-Qaeda di Syria.

Tentera kerajaan melancarkan serangan lewat Disember untuk menawan semula beberapa wilayah Idlib dan menjamin keselamatan jalan raya menghubungkan selatan Aleppo ke Damsyik

 

Syrian Children Dream Of A Brighter Future

Syrian refugee children discuss the challenges of a fractured life, and convey their hopes for the future.

Despite being confined to the informal Bar Elias tent settlement in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, sisters Nagham, seven, and Raneem, eight, say they still try to make the most of their new life. Raneem says: ‘Every day we draw pictures of flowers and houses, so our family can have beautiful things to look at. We miss our home in Syria, but we are together.’ As for the future? ‘A doctor,’ says Raneem. ‘An artist,’ says Nagham.

 

Five years since the start of Syria’s war, millions of Syrians are struggling to survive as refugees, not knowing when they will be able to return home – or whether they will have a home to return to.

The Danish Refugee Council offers a glimpse of life through the eyes of Syria’s children, as they seek refuge in Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon and Iraq. The children discuss their hopes and dreams as they struggle to make sense of their new, fragile and confined worlds.

 

Seven-year-old Bushra is the sole survivor of a bomb that struck her home in Homs and killed her family. With her grandmother, she made the long journey to Lebanon, mostly on foot, with nothing but the clothes on her back. She now lives in a Danish Refugee Council centre in Tripoli, Lebanon. Asked what she likes most, Bushra lists her grandmother, spaghetti and school. ‘I like French. I want to be a French teacher.’

 

He may be just 11, but Carmel is on track to become a hip-hop star. ‘When I think about Syria, I feel sad,’ he says. ‘Rapping helps take away my bad mood. I want to be famous and for people to know what is important to Syrian people like me.’ Carmel has lived in a refugee centre with 20 other Syrian families in northern Tripoli since his family fled Homs three years ago. With no secondary education available to refugee children in the area, Carmel’s education will soon come to an end.

 

‘Picking flowers.’ After some thought, this is the answer four-year-old Omayama gives when asked about her favourite thing to do in Syria. ‘I can’t find any flowers here.’ Along with her cousins, the softly spoken four-year-old remembers collecting camomile flowers from the hills near her home in Idlib every morning to give to her mum. Omayama now lives with her family in a plastic shelter in Akkar, in northern Lebanon.

 

Raheem, 11, a Syrian refugee from rural Idlib, lives in a small lean-to shack with nine family members in Akkar, in northern Lebanon. Every day, he helps his mother to look after his siblings and takes himself to school. He said he is studying hard to one day become a lawyer.

 

Twins Elad and Thaweel, both four, live with their parents and three siblings in a small, rented apartment in the impoverished Nazzal suburb of Amman. They twins are adapting to a confined, urban life while still struggling to make sense of the violence they have fled. ‘I hope they can experience happiness and what it is like to live a life of freedom,’ says Ahmad, the twins’ father.

 

Five-year-old Hussein said he feels the happiest when looking after his family’s sheep flock. ‘In Syria, we had many sheep and lots of fields. Here, you have to be careful that the sheep don’t run away,’ Hussein says. He now lives with his extended family in an informal settlement in Halba, in northern Lebanon, along with several dozen other families from Idlib. As traditional shepherds, Hussein’s family has relied on the income made from selling sheep’s milk, meat and wool for generations.

 

Becoming the man of the house is not a role that most nine-year-old boys have to consider. But for Abdul Almonaf, helping his mum take responsibility for running their small two-bedroom flat in Amman, and assisting his younger sisters and brother has become his everyday routine. ‘I have watched his moods change from being a happy boy when we lived in Syria, to being very serious. He worries that we have no heating and little food. Boys should not be having these thoughts,’ Abdul’s mother said. Abdul has not seen his father since he left in search of employment more than two years ago. As for the future, Abdul hopes to be able to play football like he did in Aleppo, and to become a doctor to support his family.

 

Asked how important it is that Lamees grows up knowing she is Syrian, the young girl’s father, Omar, responds: ‘Very. Knowing who you are is vital. I always try to teach her about Syria, our land, our family, and our culture. She is living an uncertain life, so it is even more important that she knows who she is.’ Lamees, who was born in Jordan, ‘is living a different life fromwhat we knew’, Omar adds. ‘Before our children had space, fields to play in and a very social life with our relatives. Now Lamees spends most of her time in this small apartment with just her parents.’ Lamees says she hopes to go to school and make lots of friends.

 

Halad, 13, has only one dream: to go to school again. For the past two years, he has not been able to attend school, as secondary education is not available for refugees in Jordan’s Zaatari camp. Halad worries that he will forget everything he has learned. Each Friday, he plays football with other children on a dirt pitch. He also seeks learning opportunities at the Gerda Henkel Siftung School, where he and fellow Syrian and Jordanian students learn about their history and shared culture. ‘It makes me feel happy to know new things,’ says Halad, who one day hopes to be a police officer.

 

Ali, seven, smiles when asked about his friends. He boasts proudly that he has three good friends: Hamudi, Sherou and Aski. They all live in small, two-room tents in the Kawergosk refugee camp in Erbil, Iraq, along with more than 10,000 other Syrian refugees. Ali said he does not have any toys; instead, he and his friends play hide-and-seek. If he could get toys, he says he would like some small cars. Ali does not go to school and has lived in the refugee camp for two years since his family fled violence in al-Hasakah, Syria. Asked what he remembers about Syria, Ali says it is ‘sleeping outside’ on warm nights.

 

Ahmad, nine, has not seen his older brother Mohammed for a long time. He knows that four months ago, his brother made it to Denmark with other Syrians, but he has not sent any money yet. Ahmad lives with his mother, five siblings and 83-year-old grandmother in a tent in the Darashakran refugee camp in Erbil, Iraq, having fled violence in al-Qamishli, Syria, in August 2013. His father left them, unable to deal with their destitution. Completely dependent on aid to meet their daily needs, Ahmad said he works hard at school so he will one day be able to get a good job to help support the family. He plans to become a maths teacher in the future

 

The frightening night 13-year-old Amina and her family were forced to flee the only home they ever knew in Kobane, Syria, is etched in her memory like it was yesterday. Amid brutal fighting, her parents rounded up Amina and her seven siblings. Their comfortable home was destroyed, and the construction company her father owned is also gone now. Since October 2015, Amina has tried to make a new life for herself in Iraq’s Qushtapa refugee camp. She keeps up her studies at school and is proud to be among the best students in her class. Amina says she hopes she will see her friends in Syria again, and hopes to one day become an Arabic teacher and teach children in the same situation as her own.

 

Jihad, 11, says he works hard at school, but he was a better student in Syria because he could concentrate more there. The school was an actual building and not a tent, and his head was clearer – war and the future did not fill his thoughts. Despite this, Jihad says he is determined to work hard to become a doctor. He also likes to enjoy himself, playing football, hide-and-seek and riding his bicycle. His family lost everything when they fled their home in Derik, Syria, for Qushtapa refugee camp in Erbil in August 2013. ‘I would give my flesh so they could have all they need,’ Jihad’s father, Hissam, says of his children.

 

Ask 11-year-old Ramadan about his future, and he does not hesitate to respond: ‘Germany.’ He fled Ashmili, Syria, two years ago, and his new life involves hanging out in the family’s caravan at Iraq’s Basherma refugee camp. Although he went to school in Syria, Ramadan is struggling in his new surroundings. He refuses to go to school, saying he is picked on by other students and the teacher. In the future, he would like to get back to learning about computers and playing football. He used to like both ‘very much’

 

Although 14-year-old Nashmir does not get to see the close group of friends she left behind in al-Malikiya, Syria, she chats with them online every chance she can. Although the teenager says she has made new friends in the refugee camp where she now lives, she admits they are not the same. She spends a lot of her time drawing her thoughts and dreams, and hopes that one day she will become a teacher.

 

Four-year-old Omar thinks of himself as a traveller. In his short life, he has lived in Aleppo, Syria; Cairo, Egypt; Antakya, Turkey; and next month he will call Norway home. He says moving around has meant he can make friends easily. He travels with a small backpack that holds some books and his clothes. While he likes to travel, he says it is sometimes hard to play football well when you cannot practise all the time.

 

 

Pelarian Syria Dibawa ke Montenegro

BELGRADE: Sekumpulan 11 pelarian warga Syria yang menumpang bot nelayan Itali, hari ini, diselamatkan di Laut Adriatik sebelum dibawa ke Montenegro, kata polis.

 

Keselamatan pantai Montenegro menghantar pasukan penyelamat selepas bot Erica berukuran 15 meter panjang berkenaan menghantar isyarat kecemasan berjarak 17 batu nautika (31km) dari pantai, lapor pengarah keselamatan maritim, Safet Kocan.

 

Kapal Itali yang membawa 17 pendatang berkenaan akhirnya diarah berlabuh di pelabuhan Montenegro, Zelenika yang terletak dalam teluk Boka Kotorska.

 

Polis berkata, kira-kira 11 warga Syria berada dalam kapal itu bersama dua rakyat Monaco, dua dari Yaman, seorang warga Afghanistan manakala seorang lagi rakyat Pakistan, yang turut disertai sekumpulan kanak-kanak.

 

“Isyarat kecemasan diterima pagi ini dihantar bot memancing Itali, Erica yang meminta bantuan kerana ia hampir karam,” kata polis menerusi satu kenyataan.

 

“Siasatan mendapati, anak kapal Erica sebelum ini pernah membawa pelarian dari bot kembung kecil merentas perairan antarabangsa.”

 

Tidak seperti jirannya, Serbia dan Croatia, Montenegro, sebuah negara kecil Adriatik disifatkan tempat paling selamat bagi ratusan ribu pendatang dari Asia Barat, Afrika, Asia untuk menyeberangi Balkan menuju ke negara Barat.

Digelar sebagai ‘Laluan Balkan’, laluan berkenaan bagaimanapun ditutup pada 2016 apabila Turki bersetuju menyekat kemasukan pendatang sebagai balasan kepada batuan diterima daripada Kesatuan Eropah (EU) selain kemudahan perjalanan tanpa visa dinikmati rakyatnya.

 

Sumber : Berita Harian Online

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Struggling With Health Needs

 

In 2011, the popular uprising against the rule of President Bashar al-Assadhad major consequences, one of which is forcing millions of Syrians to flee the country. Lebanon, already struggling under complex political and socioeconomic fragility, is currently hosting the largest number of refugeesper capita.

Marj El Khohk informal refugees’ camp is located in the Khiam Valley in south Lebanon. Around 500 Syrian families live there under very poor conditions. Most of them are farmers originally from Aleppo and its environs.

When they arrived at the camp five years ago, they were registered by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); but a year ago, the registration of newcomers stopped.

In response, humanitarian organisations had to initiate strategic plans to deal with this situation, and in 2012, Amel Association launched an emergency plan to respond to the Syrian crisis, in cooperation with international and local organisations.

In Marj El Khohk, Amel Association is supporting the refugees in covering their primary health needs.

 

Around 300 children live in this camp. Some of them go to school, but most of the time, they stay here wandering all day. Here, some children made up a game with plastic.

 

Around 300 children live in this camp. Some of them go to school, but most of the time, they stay here wandering all day. Here, some children made up a game with plastic.

 

The syrian refugees live in very poor conditions, in makeshifts tents. This camp is located close to the Israeli border, so the area is watched by Lebanese services. A specific “permit” is needed to come in this camp, and each newcomer receives a visit of the National Intelligence. Here, a man walks in between the linel drying outside.

 

The lebanese government forbidds the refugees to build concrete shelters, as they do not want the situation to be permanent. Here, some refugees build a wooden shelter, as “it will still be better than a simple tent.” said Ali, one of the men.

 

Syrian refugee children suffer a lot from this situation, as they cannot have a proper education and live in camps like this one. Here, some children play in front of their shelter.

 

Children play with rocks while a man watches the hills outside the camp

 

Refugees always find a way to improve their shelters: either with some material they found, with what is donated to them. To earn a living, men work most of the time as daily workers. In urban areas, mostly 100% of the syrian children are working.

 

 

 

 

Syrian Refugee Crisis : Questions Answered

The Syrian refugee crisis remains one of the largest humanitarian crises since the end of World War II. The number of refugees who have fled the country now exceeds five million, including more than 2.4 million children, and millions more have been displaced internally, according to the United Nations.

 Syrians have poured across their borders since anti-government protests in 2011 spiralled into a full-blown war between rebels, government troops and foreign backers.

The first three months of 2017 saw more than 250,000 additional Syrians register as refugees, bringing the total to 5.1 million, according to the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR.

“It’s not about the number, it’s about the people,” UNHCR spokesman Babar Baloch said, noting that the conflict has now lasted longer than World War II. “We’re trying to look for understanding, solidarity and humanity.”

Turkey continues to host the highest number of displaced Syrians, at nearly three million, with an increase of 47,000 since February, Baloch said.

When is a person considered a refugee?

Refugees are persons forced to leave their homes and countries because their lives and freedoms are in danger.

 The 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees describes a refugee as any person who, “owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country”.

 But this definition has been broadened to cover persons who are forced to leave their countries because of widespread violence, war and foreign occupation that has put their lives at risk in their home countries.

 The reason for leaving one’s country is considered as the main factor in distinguishing refugees from migrants.

How and when did the Syrian refugee crisis start?

The flow of Syrian refugees to neighbouring countries started during the onset of the civil war in 2011.

 The Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and other Arab countries inspired protests in Syria, prompting a crackdown by the Syrian army. As Syria descended into a civil war, it became divided into a complex battle between the government, rebel groups and foreign backers.

 By May 2011, the number of refugees crossing the Turkish border was estimated at just 300.

What countries have taken in Syrian refugees, and which country has the most? 

According to Amnesty International, Syrian refugees have sought shelter in five countries throughout the Middle East, including TurkeyLebanonJordan Iraq and Egypt.

Turkey is the largest host country of registered refugees, with nearly three million.

 None of the six states that form the Gulf Cooperation Council – Saudi Arabia, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain and Qatar – has signed the UN convention on refugees, which has governed international law on asylum since World War II.

However, the Gulf states say they have taken in hundreds of thousands of Syrians since the civil war began – just not as refugees.

 

Can refugees become citizens?

 In 2016, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that Syrian refugees living in Turkey could eventually be granted citizenship, but he gave no details on eligibility criteria or how long the process would take.

In Jordan, more than 26,000 Syrians have obtained work permits, but refugees do not automatically acquire rights to residency.

More than one million Syrian refugees have made Lebanon their temporary home, but last year, President Michel Aoun vowed to send them back to their home country.

 Egypt also became a major destination for Syrian refugees, but many have since fled their adopted homeland, in part because of a rising tide of anti-Syrian sentiment that took hold during the unrest following the toppling of the country’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, in 2013.

 

Source : Al Jazeera

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Gencatan Senjata : Kelegaan Sementara Rakyat Syria

KANAK-KANAK Syria bermain di kawasan yang dikawal kumpulan pemberontak di Harasta, di wilayah Gouta Timur, Syria kelmarin

BEIRUT 27 Jan. – Gencatan senjata yang dirundingkan oleh Rusia berkuat kuasa di Ghouta Timur, kubu terakhir kumpulan pemberontak di ibu kota Damsyik, dijangka memberi sedikit kelegaan kepada kira-kira 400,000 orang di kawasan yang mengalami masalah malnutrisi dan kekurangan perubatan yang teruk.

Menurut portal berita Al Jazeera, gencatan senjata itu perGhouta Timur berada di bawah pengepungan kerajaan sejak tahun 2013 diumumkan di Vienna, Austria selepas rundingan terbaharu Pertubuhan Bangsa-Bangsa Bersatu (PBB) antara kerajaan Syria dan pembangkang berakhir tanpa sebarang kemajuan besar.

Namun wartawan Al Jazeera berkata, tidak semua puak pembangkang di Ghouta Timur menandatangani perjanjian itu dan tidak dapat dipastikan tempoh gencatan senjata akan berlansung.

Sepanjang dua bulan lalu, jet pejuang Rusia dan tentera Syria telah memperhebat serangan udara dan pengeboman di kawasan pemberontak itu.

Perjanjian itu dibuat ketika pihak pembangkang Syria mengumumkan rancangan untuk memboikot rundingan damai oleh Rusia di Sochi minggu depan.

Mereka menyifatkan rundingan tersebut merupakan usaha untuk menggugat inisiatif Pertubuhan Bangsa-bangsa Bersatu (PBB) untuk memeterai perjanjian damai di wilayah bergolak itu.

“Kami mendengar banyak jaminan mengenai komitmen, tetapi tidak satu pun daripadanya yang benar-benar dilaksanakan mereka dihantar entah bagaimana,” kata Ahya al-Aridi, jurucakap pembangkang Syria, berikutan pengumuman itu.

“Kami sudah bosan dengan semua janji-janji palsu itu, kita memerlukan pembabitan sebenar, kita memerlukan komitmen yang sebenar,” kata jurucakap pembangkang Syria, Ahya al-Aridi kepada Al Jazeera.

 

Sumber : Utusan Online

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Sejuta kanak-kanak Pelarian Syria Tidak Sekolah

BEIRUT, Khamis – Dianggarkan kira-kira sejuta kanak-kanak pelarian Syria tidak mendapat pendidikan formal di Lubnan, Turki dan Jordan ekoran terpaksa bekerja bagi memenuhi keperluan hidup.

Menurut laporan bertulis Institut Pembangunan Luar Negara (ODI), kebanyakan kanak-kanak pelarian ini tidak mampu membayar pengangkutan mereka untuk ke sekolah.

Pengarah Eksekutif ODI, Kevin Watkins berkata, pelarian Syria memerlukan lebih banyak sumbangan bagi membantu memenuhi keperluan makanan dan dana asas lain.

“Jika anda sebagai ibu bapa berhadapan dengan pilihan sama ada membayar pengangkutan untuk menghantar anak ke sekolah atau bekalan makanan yang mencukupi, sudah pasti anda pilih makanan yang cukup,” katanya.

ODI berkata, lebih 500,000 pelarian Syria di Lubnan tidak mempunyai makanan yang mencukupi, dan 70 peratus daripada mereka hidup dengan pendapatan yang berada pada paras kemiskinan negara.

Hampir 90,000 pelarian yang bersekolah di Lubnan bakal berdepan dengan kehilangan tempat belajar berikutan kekangan dana yang dihadapi, kata laporan itu.

Sementara itu, Menteri Pendidikan Lubnan, Elias Bu Saab menggesa pihak yang mahu menderma untuk menunaikan janji mereka pada Februari lalu bagi membiayai pendidikan kanak-kanak pelarian.

“Bagi pihak kami, kami akan melakukan apa yang termampu untuk memastikan setiap kanak-kanak pelarian ini menerima pendidikan di sekolah.

“Namun, kami tidak boleh melakukannya sendiri,” katanya.

Sumber : www.indahnyaislam.my

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Bayi Syria Tinggal Tulang, Kurang Nutrisi Tarik Perhatian Dunia

DAMSYIK – Tahun lalu, video kanak-kanak lelaki Syria, Omran Daquneesh berlumuran darah dan debu dalam sebuah ambulans selepas berlakunya serangan udara di Aleppo menarik perhatian seluruh dunia.

Terbaharu, gambar seorang bayi yang mengalami masalah kekurangan nutrisi akibat perang saudara di negara itu pula tersebar sekaligus menimbulkan kesedihan di hati seluruh umat Islam.

Memetik Mirror News, gambar bayi lelaki berkenaan dirakam di sebuah hospital di Hamouria yang terletak di timur Damsyik.

Pihak hospital memaklumkan, bayi lelaki berkenaan hanya memiliki berat 1.81 kilogram, bagaimanapun tidak dapat dipastikan berapa usianya.

Gambar itu adalah gambaran menyedihkan yang menimpa golongan kanak-kanak di Syria, bahkan banyak lagi kesengsaraan yang dialami mereka tetapi tidak direkodkan.

Jika tahun lalu, video Omran Daquneesh yang viral kelihatan bingung dan terkejut sambil dilihat mengelap darah di kepalanya.

Berdasarkan rakaman video, Omran seolah-olah tidak menyedari kecederaan yang dialami. Omran dilihat menyapu debu di dahinya dengan tangan sebelum menyedari ia berdarah dan meletakkan semula tangannya kembali di paha.

Mengikut kenyataan Doktor yang merawat kecederaan di kepala Omran berkata, kanak-kanak itu bersatu semula dengan ibu bapanya dan semua anggota keluarga dipercayai selamat dalam serangan yang berlaku.

Perang yang tercetus di Syria sudah mencecah tujuh tahun menyaksikan beratus-ratus ribu penduduk terbunuh dan lebih sejuta rakyat Syria kehilangan tempat tinggal.

Sumber : Ismaweb

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Konflik Syria Penyebab Kebuluran

 

Reyhanli (Turki): Berikutan konflik tidak berkesudahan, bekalan makanan di sesetengah kawasan di Syria terputus menyebabkan muftinya terpaksa mengeluarkan fatwa dibolehkan memakan kucing.

Di sesetengah wilayah Syria seperti Allepo, Dar’a, Homs, Idlib dan pinggir Damsyik masih teruk kerana terus menjadi sasaran bom tong dram serta bom kimia tentera rejim Presiden Bashar al-Assad.

Pengarah Yayasan Bantuan Kemanusiaan Turki (IHH) untuk isu Syria di sini, Mus’ab berkata, ulama Syria mengeluarkan fatwa mengharuskan memakan haiwan terbabit kerana tiada apa yang tinggal termasuk rumput untuk dimakan di sesetengah kawasan.

“Keadaan paling susah adalah musim sejuk sebab khemah macam peti sejuk namun musim panas juga hebat cabarannya sebab khemah menjadi seperti ketuhar,” katanya.

Beliau berkata demikian dalam taklimat di pejabat IHH iaitu antara NGO yang terbesar dunia berpusat di Turki.

Mus’ab turut menyatakan penghargaan atas usaha rakyat Malaysia yang membantu menyediakan sekolah untuk pendidikan anak pelarian Syria.

Dalam perkembangan berkaitan, Mus’ab berkata, konflik di Syria sudah memasuki tahun keenam dan ramai sudah keciciran pelajaran.

“Di tanah Syria seberang sempadan Reyhanli terdapat lebih 500,000 pelarian tinggal di kem.

“Sudah enam tahun mereka dalam keadaan sedemikian rupa.

“Jika konflik berlanjutan hingga lebih 10 tahun lagi, Syria akan kehilangan pelapis profesional termasuk doktor, guru, arkitek, jurutera malah mungkin tukang gunting rambut pun tak ada. Ini disebabkan kanak-kanak tercicir pendidikan,” katanya.

Menurutnya, di wilayah ini sahaja terdapat seramai 120,000 pelarian Syria berbanding 60,000 rakyat tempatan Turki.

Secara berseloroh dia mengumpamakan pendatang itu jika boleh mengundi, tentunya akan menguasai wilayah Reyhanli.

“Namun kami di Turki sedaya-upaya untuk memastikan anak pelarian Syria tidak tercicir dalam pelajaran.

“Bangunlah dunia, Syria kini umpama anak yatim piatu yang memerlukan ibu bapa angkat untuk keselamatan dan masa depan mereka,” katanya.

 

—————————————-
1. Saudara yang prihatin boleh terus menyumbang melalui bank pilihan secara online (FPX):
.
INFAQ SEKARANG www.tabungsyria.com
INFAQ SEKARANG www.tabungsyria.com
INFAQ SEKARANG www.tabungsyria.com
.
ATAU
.
2. Salurkan Sumbangan
Menerusi Maybank Islamic
SYRIA EMERGENCY APPEAL (DANA MAPIM)
Akaun No : 562834636987
.
Boleh emailkan slip sumbangan kepada admin@tabungsyria.com atau send whatapps ke no 0194810025
.
Jazazallah
SANI ARABY AL-KAHERY
Ketua Misi Bantuan Kecemasan RescueSyria (MAPIM)

 

What’s Left of Syria?

In the past four years, the Syrian war has increased in intensity causing severe damage and destruction to most of the country.

Millions have lost their homes while hundreds of thousands have been killed. What was once a country steeped in history and diverse culture is now a war-torn country brought to rubble

Here is what’s left of Syria.

 

PEOPLE

7.1 million internally displaced

10.9 million displaced

3.8 million refugees

At least

210,000 killed

1.5 million civilians seriously wounded
At least 200,000 detained

At least 2,400 reportedly missing

 

HEALTHCARE

57% of hospitals damaged
36% of hospitals destroyed

At least 50% of Syrian physicians have fled

 

BUILDINGS AND HOMES

At least 3 million buildings have been affected
1.2 million homes destroyed

9,000 industrial facilities completely destroyed

 

SCHOOLS

At least 3,878 schools destroyed
At least 2,500 schools now shelter to 65,000 IDP’s

2.8 million Syrians are out of school

 

PLACES OF WORSHIP

At least 1,451 mosques were targeted

348 mosques totally destroyed

 

CULTURAL AND HERITAGE SITES

290 locations affected
104 severely damaged and 24 completely destroyed

5/6 UNESCO World Heritage Sites damaged

 

CITIES

Damascus

Out of at least 2.65 million civilians, almost 2.5 million remain living in the capital

Aleppo

Out of at least 4 million civilians, Aleppo is left with almost 3 million residents by 2014

Homs

Out of 1.4 million residents in Homs- more than half have been killed or displaced

 

—————————————-
1. Saudara yang prihatin boleh terus menyumbang melalui bank pilihan secara online (FPX):
.
INFAQ SEKARANG www.tabungsyria.com
INFAQ SEKARANG www.tabungsyria.com
INFAQ SEKARANG www.tabungsyria.com
.
ATAU
.
2. Salurkan Sumbangan
Menerusi Maybank Islamic
SYRIA EMERGENCY APPEAL (DANA MAPIM)
Akaun No : 562834636987
.
Boleh emailkan slip sumbangan kepada admin@tabungsyria.com atau send whatapps ke no 0194810025
.
Jazazallah
SANI ARABY AL-KAHERY
Ketua Misi Bantuan Kecemasan RescueSyria (MAPIM)